Question about alternate PWC controls

Status
Not open for further replies.

Jrzygrl

Senior member
Joined
Feb 14, 2017
Messages
552
Reason
Lost a loved one
Diagnosis
08/2014
Country
US
State
NJ
At clinic earlier this week, DH explained the troubles he was having controlling his PWC. He has lost just about all control of his hands, save his right thumb. The wheelchair rep suggested trying a different joystick, but when the OT came in (wish they could have been there together) he suggested maybe it was time to look into a head array. They are scheduling an eval at the wheelchair clinic.

I know I have read that the joystick can be moved to the back of the chair for "attendant control". Can this be done in conjunction with the head array? I ask for 2 reasons - 1) I heard there is a learning curve with the head array and I'd like to be able to help him if he becomes frustrated and 2) In case he can no longer use the head array, then we won't need another visit to get the controls moved. Does this make sense?
 

affected

Guru status reached
Joined
Apr 26, 2013
Messages
11,824
Reason
Lost a loved one
Diagnosis
05/2013
Country
OZ
State
home
Both PWC's we had (first joystick, then head array) had attendant controls on the back, so they both had 2 sets of controls. At the time I presumed that was standard but seems it is not.
 

lgelb

Forum Supporter
Moderator
Joined
Nov 5, 2009
Messages
7,589
Reason
Lost a loved one
Diagnosis
09/2009
Country
US
State
WA
Yes, as Tillie notes, you can have both. Just make sure that the depth in back accommodates your shallowest turn in the house, any elevators you use, etc.
 

KateEmerson

Distinguished member
Joined
Apr 23, 2016
Messages
468
Reason
Lost a loved one
Diagnosis
09/2013
Country
US
State
MA
A couple I know got head array and attendant control at the same time as an add on. She still will not use the attendant control. I went to their house to help her practice and found I had a very difficult time using it even though I had " driven " my husband's WC for over a year ( backwards with his normally placed joystick). My observation/expierence with it was that it was way too sensitive. So, long story short, I would recommend that you don't let the WC rep leave until he adjusts the sensitivity to your liking. Kate
 

lgelb

Forum Supporter
Moderator
Joined
Nov 5, 2009
Messages
7,589
Reason
Lost a loved one
Diagnosis
09/2009
Country
US
State
WA
Sensitivity is easy for the tech to adjust, as is the default "profile" that governs max speed at the different "notches," so to speak. But yeah, set yourself a test like getting him to a set location with barriers in the way like door frames and walls, that demand precision turns and speed control, then make sure the DME adjusts to settings that allow you to pass the test.

And Kate, you might suggest that your friend hound her DME, call the regional manager of DME and/or the local mfr rep etc. to make this right.

Failing that, wheelchair techs in the community are poorly paid so if she gets the word out on Craigslist, Taskrabbit, etc. she can likely find someone to do it for a few dollars cash. There is a manual for every control system detailing the programming, and depending on when/how the system was set up, a dongle or keycode may or may not be required.
 
Last edited:
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top