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Old 04-30-2016, 11:11 AM #4 (permalink)
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♥ lgelb lgelb is offline
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Join Date: 2009
City: Seattle
State: WA
Country: US
Diagnosed: 09/2009
Interest: I lost a loved one to ALS/MND.
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♥ lgelb lgelb is offline
Extremely Helpful Member

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lgelb's Avatar
Join Date: 2009
City: Seattle
State: WA
Country: US
Diagnosed: 09/2009
Interest: I lost a loved one to ALS/MND.
Posts: 4,449
lgelb has a brilliant futurelgelb has a brilliant futurelgelb has a brilliant futurelgelb has a brilliant futurelgelb has a brilliant futurelgelb has a brilliant futurelgelb has a brilliant futurelgelb has a brilliant futurelgelb has a brilliant futurelgelb has a brilliant futurelgelb has a brilliant future
Default Re: ALS and diabetes

ALS appears to be at least in part a metabolic disorder, in that hypermetabolism has been identified in PALS. But especially as activity slows down, I would expect new diabetes dx in PALS and any other population.

Larry's Type 2 actually improved with ALS, to the point that he had normal A1cs (same dose of Januvia and metformin throughout) but he had so many rare conditions it is hard to say why. He also maintained his weight after an initial 10 lb loss early on. For what it's worth, his diet was high fat/high protein (more so post-ALS than before, which had been more carbs) because that's what was easier for him to eat. I do believe that change was helpful overall.

Last edited by lgelb : 05-01-2016 at 01:28 PM
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