transfer lifts help

ARCG

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I agree with the folks that recommend a power/electronic lift. The lift isn’t an occasional use device and it Is important to keep the caregiver healthy.
 

Doglady

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Just one little comment - there are some slings that are better for use ing the commode than others. I think it’s called a hygiene sling?
 

Jrzygrl

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Kristina,

We had a manual lift at first. It worked OK, but because my DH was so tall, we had issues with the lift height. The ALS loan closet was able to get us an Invacare 450 power lift which was awesome. It not only was easier to use, but the lift height was much better.

We had 2 slings also. One was a u-sling, but the one we really liked was one that @JimInVA suggested. It was the Liko HygieneVest Model 55. It has a high back with head support. It is a little different than the traditional sling in that it uses wide straps. It's great for going from a sitting to sitting position - ie PWC to toilet or commode and back. We found this incredibly useful for positioning on the toilet. It allowed him to be more upright, where the traditional u-sling left him tilted too far back. We could also easily get DH's pants up and down for toileting using this sling.We did have to pay for this one out-of-pocket, but it was worth every penny.
 

lgelb

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Jimi, I do believe that manual lifting can be hard on the back over time, just as any other kind. If everyone had perfect mechanics, etc., maybe not so much. I hope your daughter maintains a neutral spine position with no multitasking.
 

diagnosed2016

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I lifted my husband for the duration of his Illness with no hoyer. No one could believe that I did because he was bigger than me, but I believe it’s because we had figured out a good grip that made it easier for both of us. I would bend down to where I could put his arms over my shoulders, then wrap my arms around his back. I was then able to use my leg strength to raise him and his torso was stable because of his arms being around my neck. I don’t know if that’s helpful but maybe? I know it all depends on where your strength still is and it takes a few times successfully to get a handle on where the body is off balance (for the lifter). I realize it’s safer to use a hoyer but perhaps working on a different technique will help in the meantime. A PT could also give pointers.
 

affected

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My Chris had a lot of UMN involvement so he had a lot of spasticity and frozen joints. There is no way he could have been safely moved, especially positioned into bed without a lift. I would not recommend anyone lift their PALS - assisting them to stand and pivot when they can at least partially weight bear is one thing.
Really it mostly all depends on the PALS - anyone with torso issues, neck issues, breathing issues will need safe lifting.

We were able for months to use the lift sometimes, and a standing transfer at others, so we kind of transitioned.
 

Jimi

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I lifted my husband for the duration of his Illness with no hoyer. No one could believe that I did because he was bigger than me, but I believe it’s because we had figured out a good grip that made it easier for both of us. I would bend down to where I could put his arms over my shoulders, then wrap my arms around his back. I was then able to use my leg strength to raise him and his torso was stable because of his arms being around my neck. I don’t know if that’s helpful but maybe? I know it all depends on where your strength still is and it takes a few times successfully to get a handle on where the body is off balance (for the lifter). I realize it’s safer to use a hoyer but perhaps working on a different technique will help in the meantime. A PT could also give pointers.
I like your ingenuity!
 

Nikki J

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I lifted my husband for the duration of his Illness with no hoyer. No one could believe that I did because he was bigger than me, but I believe it’s because we had figured out a good grip that made it easier for both of us. I would bend down to where I could put his arms over my shoulders, then wrap my arms around his back. I was then able to use my leg strength to raise him and his torso was stable because of his arms being around my neck.

that is how my sister transferred She was small and shorter than anyone that did transfers for her. She was not very spastic but virtually paralyzed
 

Tkthiede

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Does CCALS only help people in the Massachusetts area?
I fell again today and I know I need to get a lift. My husband is handicapped as well so he has trouble with helping me. The Rocky Mountain ALS chapter has a loan closet but they aren't loaning right now because of coronavirus (since mid-March). I'm not sure it's safe for me to wait until we are all cleared to go about business as usual. That could be May to July.The falls seem to be tougher to get up from now. I'm going to contact them again in hopes we can work out something. I have a prescription but I have Medicare and know they won't pay for electric/power lifts. Would my supplemental insurance cover the difference? Can you get assistance rom other sources? Thanks in advance for any thoughts or ideas.
 

Nikki J

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Yes sorry. CCALS is New England area

you might try gleason foundation or ALS guardian angels or ask your alsa if there is any grant money to help.

Generally medicare supplement policies do not contribute toward things medicare does not cover

good luck
 

KateEmerson

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A couple of thoughts, I don't know what your husband's limitations are but I am only 120 lbs with a tricky back and I was able to lift my 200lb husband with a regular pump type Hoyer that was paid for by Medicare. If he can do it it could be a stop gap until you can get an electric one.

Another thought is posting your need on the Facebook group ALS- Patient and Caregiver tips for every day living. It has over 10,000 members and maybe someone who lives near you has one they can give you, I've seen this happen numerous times.
 

lgelb

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If no loaners/donations are available, which I would agree with Kate and Nikki are worth beating the bushes for, would double-check the difference between a Medicare copay for a manual lift and cash for a power lift you can buy on line at sites like SpinLife, which offers monthly payment plans. It might pencil out.
 
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