Tachycardia and ALS

billybob

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I was diagnosed with limb onset ALS in Septemer 2017. I have recently been diagnosed with tachycardia by my cardioligist, wherein my resting heart rate suddenly spikes to 140-165 and stays that way for 2-5 minutes and then subsides. Does anyone know if this is a common issue with ALS? Has any fellow PALSer experienced this?
 

KarenNWendyn

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I can’t think of how it would be directly related to ALS since cardiac muscle is not controlled by motor neurons. It can indirectly be related to poor respiratory function or dehydration as well as other conditions.
 

nona

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what about meds? Are you on Mexilitene...?
 

Clearwater AL

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Have you been checked for a hiatal hernia?

Depending how you sit a hiatal hernia can cause
a compression that may trigger tachycardia.

Lifting something, stooping as you lift something or just bending or stooping
or after eating... maybe too much.

Did your cardiologist give any possibilities such as.... Wolff Parkinson White Syndrome?

Hope your Cardio can help you with that....
 
Last edited:

KimT

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Does the tachycardia stop suddenly? It could be something like supraventricular tachycardia which can be triggered by eating too much, bending over, a simple PAC or medication. I've dealt with this for 40 years. I can't take stimulants. Even a few drinks of coffee triggers it.

You may need a holter monitor to figure out what it is.
 

billybob

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Thanks everyone! I'm now wearing a Holter monitor so hopefully this will help determine a problem, if any. The cardiologist is concerned because of family history: My mother battled Afib and eventually suffered and died from a massive stroke, and two of my cousins on my late father's side of the family died suddenly at ages 29 and 56 from cardiac arrest - both died from some sort of electrical malfunction while exercising (one playing basketball and one on a tread mill). At least I can do neither of those these days :(.
 

Clearwater AL

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Billybob, from what you wrote above....

"....both died from some sort of electrical malfunction."

This sounds very much like Wolff Parkinson White Syndrome which can be corrected with a
procedure. I don't know if this is a inherited condition.... I'm sure your cardiologist will help
you with this.
 

KimT

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Al, It does would like WPW Syndrome. My friend lost her 22-year old daughter to it. After that her whole family was tested and three of them were positive for WPW.
 

billybob

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Update: the final diagnosis following the Holter monitor test period is Atrial Fibrillation, so I'm now taking an Rx called Pradaxa and an Rx called Metoprolol. I asked if Afib is related to ALS and he seemed to think it would be worth discussing with the neurologist, so I'll check with the ALS clinic when I go there next month. However, since my mother had Afib and passed away from two strokes, and since two cousins passed from sudden cardiac failure at ages 29 and 57 respectively, the cardiologist is leaning toward a genetic issue vs. ALS related. #nevergiveup #keepshovelin'
 

KimT

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Pradaxa is a blood thinner used to help prevent strokes in people with Afib. Metoprolol is a beta blocker. It reduces blood pressure and can also reduce heart rate. Both are routinely used in Afib. I'm glad you got to the bottom of it.

I also take a beta blocker for a heart arrhythmia (Sectral) and have been for over 30 years. Depending on the dosage, beta blockers can prevent your heart from working too hard or even beating too fast. Your neurologist should be in the loop in case either drug causes breathing issues.

I've only had one stress test in my life. They had the treadmill on full incline and I was running 6 MPH. Because of the beta blocker, my heart rate wouldn't go above 135.
 

KarenNWendyn

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I think it’s highly unlikely the Afib is related to ALS. More likely genetic. If you have any history of high blood pressure, that can also contribute. Fortunately there are medications to control it.
 
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