Status
Not open for further replies.

stormgem

New member
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Messages
2
Reason
Learn about ALS
Country
Ire
State
Mayo
Hi,

I have read the stickies regarding ALS and I admire the commitment of everyone who takes the time to answer all the questions.

I am 63 years old male having retired from work last March and my general health is good, I have haemochromatosis (iron overload) which is well managed by my local hospital.

The symptoms I have started mid November 2018 when I could not sleep at night due to the soles of my feet giving a burning sensation which would last for hours thus waking me and disturbing my sleep. Although the sensation was of burning, to touch my feet they were felt normal and not hot.

This symptom continued for about 2 weeks (with disturbed sleep) and then my right shoulder and left leg started to feel weak. That's when I visited my GP - 3rd Dec - bloods taken, feet examined , nothing extraordinary and all bloods came back normal a week later.

Burning and weakness continues and on the 22nd Dec, I observed fasciculations on my left calf and as the weakness/stiffness in both my arm , shoulder and left leg persisted I went to the local hospital A&E. Doctor on duty did all the usual strength & reflex tests and noted nothing out of sync. Bloods done as was heart trace and chest xray, all normal.

No improvement in my symptoms over Christmas, so attended my GP and the 2nd Jan 2019... no sign he said of muscle loss, reviewed my charts all ok. He will set up an appointment for me with a neurologist as a matter of priority. The fasciculations he said are a concern. Any advice on questions I should ask the neurologist welcome.

Today, it seems my left calf seems weaker and very tired after a short walk which two months ago would have been no bother me. The fatigue/muscle tiredness is affecting the back of my calf muscle and now my thigh muscle which was ok till yesterday. Fasciculations on the calf of my left leg appear more widespread than previously and are now appearing on the thigh muscle (back of) as well.

Thanks for reading my post and I appreciate any comments, questions and advice you may wish to provide.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

lgelb

Forum Supporter
Moderator
Joined
Nov 5, 2009
Messages
7,755
Reason
Lost a loved one
Diagnosis
09/2009
Country
US
State
WA
"Burning" soles makes me think of a peripheral neuropathy or nutritional deficiency. Discussing your B vitamin intake in conjunction with the management of your iron levels would do no harm. Blood tests do not always reveal modest imbalances.

As you will have read here, "feeling weak" is not the same as not being able to move. I think the neuro is a good idea and s/he can rule out/identify more treatable conditions as well as rule out MND.

Best,
Laurie
 

stormgem

New member
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Messages
2
Reason
Learn about ALS
Country
Ire
State
Mayo
Laurie, thank you for taking the time to read my post and to comment.
My GP agrees with you a regards the burning feet and says it not typical in respect to MND. His concerns and mine are the fasciculations and leg & shoulder weakness.
As you will have read here, "feeling weak" is not the same as not being able to move.
I understand what you say but can i ask if weakness i.e limb weakness or muscle weakness occurs before something not being able to move/work?
And last question if I may, what role if any does pins and needles if any(paresthesia) in MND? Currently i get lots of pins and needles in my legs and hands, fingers and toes to varying degrees of severity and much more frequent since my present symptoms began than hitherto.
Thanks again for you patience.
 

lgelb

Forum Supporter
Moderator
Joined
Nov 5, 2009
Messages
7,755
Reason
Lost a loved one
Diagnosis
09/2009
Country
US
State
WA
That is just it. There is no "weak feeling." Weakness manifests as the inability to do something you could previously do, not feeling weak.

Pins and needles might come up in ALS once someone cannot move as well, due to pressure/diminished circulation, in some ways just as your foot falls asleep.

But pins and needles are not part of early ALS presentation. You are still moving. Diseases such as MS that affect both motor and sensory nerves can result in tingling and pain.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top