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Willy.Fouts

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In the beginning stages of my onset, my first neurologist had me take steroids orally. This did not help me a whole a lot physically and did a lot more damage to me mentally.

I was wondering if anybody had any insight on taking steroids with the needle and syringe instead and if that had any positive affect in any way?
 

TxRR

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What type of steroids are you talking about? And why was your neuro giving them to you? Need more details
 

AKmom

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I answered this in your other thread. It would be helpful if you kept all your questions in one thread for us to follow. Here was my answer in the other thread:

only good thing steroids are for is to treat severe inflammation. 1 of the many side effects of certain steroids can be muscle growth, however, if PLS is a dysfunction of neurons signals of the brain to the muscle, then I do not think that steroids will be of any use in the treatment of PLS. JMO.
 

TxRR

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Cortisone is a type of steroid used to treat inflammation. Anabolic steroids are used by body builders to promote muscle growth.
 

IhavePLS

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Hmmmm....interesting. I wonder if your neurologist might believe that there is an "inflammatory" component with PLS? I find this interesting because (as I've posted somewhere a long while back), I've quite often felt as if I have had "flu-like" symptoms in my legs.

From my experience as someone who has had fairly extensive history of low back pain (and lumbar fusion from L3 to S1): Alternatively, steroids are commonly prescribed for severe spasm. The more severe the spasm(s), the more inflammation in the muscle at issue.

At the same time, I agree with Joyce - that steroids will not treat the neurological etiology of PLS...but as above, treating inflammation that is ostensibly caused by spasm seems to me to have merit as a short-term treatment approach to muscular pain -- but not as a strictly neurological one.

(Actually, I don't know if any of that makes any kind of sense)!

Mike
 
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