Question? Heavy Metal Testing

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Lorie

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I was wondering if anyone on here DX with ALS have had Heavy Metal Testing done?


Role of Metals in Neurodegenerative Disorders

http://www.ebmonline.org/cgi/content/full/231/9/1481


When I was at the Neuro. yesterday, I over heard someone saying that some people maybe getting DX with ALS that actually may have Heavy Metal Toxicity.

I just would like to know. Please reply if any of you have had Heavy Metal Testing. How you were tested. The results. And if anything came of it.

Thanks,

Lorie
 

Sammantha

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When i was suspected of having vasculitis and was seen by a Rhuematologist and Immunologist clinic they ruled out autoimmune and quickly went into a referral to neurology. Before i left they wanted to take some blood for tests that they knew i would need. One of them was to check for lead and mercury.. At the time i was still unaware of ALS or anything else. My blood work was normal.
 

patricia1

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Heavy Metal Was My First Blood Test 9 Years Ago It Like All Others Were Neg,


We All Are Pulling At Straws Blaming Mercury ,toxins, Vaccinations Vietnam, Jobs Etc. The Truth Is We Cant Seem To Prove Anything And If We Do It Really Doesnt Matter. There Is Still So Much We Dont Know About This Disease.
I Know At First I Blamed Everything And Wouldn T Believe I Had Als ,and To Tell The Truth I Still Think Its A Variant They Dont Know So They Call It Als.
But I Am Here 9 Years Which I Am Told Is Rare And I Have Bulbar Onset Which Is The Worst I Was Told.
So As I Always Said They Are Clueless.


Pat 1
 

crystalkk

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The only metal I was tested for was copper in the beginning, I also here alot of posters talking about being testing for heavy metals in the rule out process.
 

Lorie

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Metals-I do not want this to become Controversial

I do not want this to become Controversial. Just exploring.

I am not grasping for straws. Just talking about the possibility. I am going to post on my Blog some links to our Mobile Register where testing is being done in the enviornment because of the higher rate of ALS and other diseases that is a lot higher than the national average.

Not every ALS patient will test for high amounts of Metals. But some may.

From what I understand you have to be tested through Stool or Urine. The best results being from Stool not Blood.

Tim has not been tested. I just want to discuss it.

Thanks for your input,

Lorie
 

hopingforthebest

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heavy metal

Hi Lorie

Yes, my husband was tested for all metals, etc. as he was diagnosed in 1996 with a genetic (Mom and Dad need to both be carriers) disease called Hemochromatosis (iron overload)

Our ALS director, Dr. McCluskey, studied and Hemochromatosis and ALS are not related in any way.

On a note regarding the iron overload- people can get tested for Hemochromatosis with simple bloodtests of: iron, iron binding and ferritin. This can be ordered on a routine blood workup. Doctors can misdiagnois this disease and because of fatigue etc., put patient on iron supplement and that can eventually kill them. Scary.

CVS collections for ALS going strong in our area! Great job!


Patty
 

ZenArcher

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Lead exposure as a risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

BACKGROUND: The etiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) likely involves an environmental component. We qualitatively assessed literature on ALS and lead exposure. Problems of study design make case reports and studies of lead in blood or tissues difficult to interpret. Most previous case-control studies found an association of ALS with self-reported occupational exposure to lead, with increased risks of 2- to >4-fold. However, these results may have been affected by recall bias. OBJECTIVE: To address inconsistencies among published reports, we used both lead biomarkers and interview data to assess lead exposure, and we evaluated the role of genetic susceptibility to lead. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study in New England in 1993-1996 with 109 ALS cases and 256 population-based controls. We measured blood and bone lead levels, the latter using X-ray fluorescence, and interviewed participants regarding sources of lead exposure. RESULTS: In our study, ALS was associated with self-reported occupational lead exposure, with a dose response for cumulative days of exposure. ALS was also associated with blood and bone lead levels, with a 1.9-fold increase in risk for each mug/dl increment in blood lead and a 2.3- to 3.6-fold increase for each doubling of bone lead. A polymorphism in the delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase gene was associated with a 1.9-fold increase in ALS risk. CONCLUSION: These results, together with previous studies, suggest that lead exposure plays a role in the etiology of ALS. An increase in mobilization of lead from bone into blood may play a role in the acute onset of disease.


Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and occupational history. A pilot case-control study.

OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of a number of occupational and industrial exposures with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). DESIGN: A case-control study of ALS cases matched by age and sex to 2 controls each: 1 from a neurologic clinic and 1 from a local community. Exposures were ascertained by questionnaire, and patients were requested before the interview to be to prepared to supply occupational histories. SETTING: Patients with ALS were enrolled at the University of Minnesota ALS Clinic in Minneapolis. PATIENTS: Patients with ALS (n = 25) were from the University of Minnesota ALS clinic, and clinic controls (n = 25) were patients with other neuromuscular diseases from the university's Muscle Disease Clinic, selected on the basis of clinic enrollment date nearest to that of the matched case. Clinic controls were principally patients with myopathies. Community controls (n = 25) were selected from the community using a random-digit-dialing protocol matching on the first 5 digits of the case patient's telephone number. RESULTS: The strongest association with disease was exposure to welding or soldering materials (odds ratio, 5.0) and the welding industry (odds ratio, 5.3). Electric plating showed a high odds ratio of 8 (95% confidence interval, 0.9-72.0), but low statistical significance (P < .07) Several exposures or industries, while not statistically different, showed enough difference that to ignore them might lead to a Type II error, a result of the pilot nature and small sample size. These included paint or pigment manufacturing, the petroleum industry, the printing industry, and shipbuilding. CONCLUSIONS: The association with welding, soldering, and the welding industry is strong and suggests a need for further work. This is despite the small numbers studied, thus making most industrial or occupational exposures too limited to draw conclusions or detect associations. Perhaps the most obvious candidate from the welding, soldering exposure for a common toxin would be lead. Other suggestions of risk were seen for paint or pigment manufacture, shipbuilding, electric plating, and the dairy industry. The degree of association for these, while high, is not statistically significant, and suggests that there may be 1 or more environmental toxins common to those industries that need more precise measurement.


Lead exposure and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

BACKGROUND: Previous interview-based studies have suggested that exposure to neurotoxicants including metals might be related to ALS. METHODS: We evaluated the relation of lead exposure to ALS, using both biological measures and interviews, in a case-control study conducted in New England from 1993 to 1996. Cases (N = 109) were recruited at two hospitals in Boston, MA. Population controls (N = 256) identified by random-digit dialing were frequency-matched to cases by age, sex, and region of residence within New England. RESULTS: Risk of ALS was associated with self-reported occupational exposure to lead (odds ratio [OR] = 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1-3.3), with a dose response for lifetime days of lead exposure. Blood and bone lead levels were measured in most cases (N = 107) and in a subset of controls (N = 41). Risk of ALS was associated with elevations in both blood and bone lead levels. ORs were 1.9 (95% CI = 1.4-2.6) for each microg/dl increase in blood lead, 3.6 (95% CI = 0.6-20.6) for each unit increase in log-transformed patella lead, and 2.3 (95% CI = 0.4-14.5) for each unit increase in log-transformed tibia lead. CONCLUSIONS: These results are consistent with previous reports and suggest a potential role for lead exposure in the etiology of ALS.


Was I exposed to lead? Yup. Do I know my levels? Nope. I personally believe heavy metals may play a role but even if they do it is only a part. Thousands of pALS have spent huge sums of money on chelation therapies. Now granted some of those therapies are nothing more than quackery but I will bet most where valid. To my knowledge none have shown improvement. I'm sure someone from a "Wellness" center will tell me otherwise but until I see a documented case I'll stay on the skeptic side.

Just my two cents. What it comes down to is if you want to know get the test done or in 'Bama speak....Git 'r done :mrgreen:
 

patricia1

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With that said They are still clueless :-?
 

trying to stay positive

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Hi Lorie,

I hope you and Tim are both doing ok. My husband had heavy metal tests done as part of his "rule out " process. I believe that was the 24 hr. urine test he had done. I assume it was neg. as we never heard anything on it that I can remember. After awhile there are so many tests done it seems like you can't keep track! Anyway, he was DX with ALS 8/07, about 2 1/2 years after first symptom.

Linda
 

sdsyd

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I do need to preface this by saying I have not been Diagnosed with ANYTHING as of yet. Something going on with central nervous system- was the thought from my last neuro appt. But I do have many of the symptoms of ALS.


My blood tests show that my RBC's are a bit larger than is to be considered normal but " nothing to get excited about". ( I don't have the numbers or ranges on hand) (re:hemochromatosis)

Regarding Heavy Metals: My neighbor, and dear friend is really quite knowledgable about homeopathy- suspected I had lead poisoning early this Spring when I told her about my symptoms. ( she has honestly CURED my family from many common ailments and I am always skeptical about non- traditional medicine) She was SO CONVINCED she went and bought me are regimin of metal flush and some Seaweed/Kelp supplement. I took it faithfully until both HUGE bottles were gone ( 3 and 4 times per day) but alas- my symptoms remain. Logically speaking I really knew it wouldn't work, but there- in the back of my mind flickered some small belief that maybe she was on to something and what could the harm in TRYING be? I felt kind of guilty when I reported back to her that the only change I noticed was colorful urine and more formed stools- LOL. My point is this- I think most of us would be willing to try something- anything? we thought might alleviate symptoms.

As far as ALS and exposure to lead- who knows for certain? Cancer has many suspected "triggers", and I imagine- so do many other complex diseases. I guess all we can do, is to contribute what we know and help fund research and cures! Now that people are more aware of the dangers of lead- I wonder if the numbers of ALS diagnosis in the USA will decrease? I,too played with mercury at the kitchen table and had many toys that were coated in lead based paint- spent alot of time at the Grandparents house- with- lead based paint all around I'm sure.
 

Cincinnati

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My husband was diagnosed in 8/2006 with ALS and symptoms started in 2005. Since the diagnosis he also had a high red blood cell count and had to go weekly for them to withdrawl blood (1 pint) to lower the count. They said his blood was the consistancy of peanut butter so thick. When you go on line and research this, some of the symptoms are like ALS. He stopped the blood withdrawls in late December and since his passing in April, 2008 I sometimes wander if it was really the red blood cell count that was the main problem. The docs said this was secondary to ALS. I would definetly investigate the RBC's a little further.
 

brooksea

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Hey Lorie,

I would 2nd Jeff's "Git 'r done," but don't really think it will be telling. My husband had the tests and nothing showed up. But, he was exposed to heavy metals and pesticides.

Don't think they have any idea!
 

kelly

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lead

My husband (41) also had the 24 hour urine test. He had elevated lead and mercury. We tried the chelation route with no improvement. He is convinced that this plays a role in ALS.
 

freddiesnetty

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I would have to agree with jimercat. Freddie had some testing also done but just some elevated levels (lead and mercury) ..... I do suspect some " other " toxic chemicals that are sometimes evolved in the realm of the rock and roll industry?
Often wondered bout that......?
Netty
 

Lorie

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Thank you for your replies

From what I understand. The right test have to be done along with the right treatments. I don't want to get any hopes up. It is something I am exploring for a reason. I just cannot go in detail the moment. Mobile is the second largest Seaport in the US. We had Papermills. We have all kinds on Chemical plants. We have many Shipbuilding companys. One of the test being done in Mobile is on Trees. The trees and Leaves are being tested randomly and the are finding Heavy Metals settled on the Leaves and Trees. As soon as I can access the information, I will post it. We have a Person, Lesley Pacey with the Mobile Register that had her daughter come down with Leukemia and her Grandmother with ALS. She has gotten the State involved. She is doing a wonderful job. It may turn out to help us all. I am in contact with her. It may take a little while for us to get the results. She is on our side.

I really appreciate your reponse. I am going to send this to Lesley. And keep
her updated. She is busy so I can try to explore the leg work, since all of you are from everywhere.

I am working for Tim and You!

I LOVE YOU ALL!

Lorie


What kind of Chelation was done?

Jeff, Like you I am skeptical. Who knows what it will turn out to be that causes ALS. I just don't want to wait on the results. Who Knows?

sdysd- I did read something about Cancer Genes and ALS. I will post it as soon as I can. I am everywhere!
 
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