Laryngospasm, Suddenly Can't Breath: Information Videos/ Straw Breathing Technique

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Katalin

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Hello all,

After a hairy morning of my mother's sudden and repeated laryngospasms, I found these two short videos online, which explains the causes, and a technique to deal with it and how that works. "Just" relaxing helped, however, I'm looking forward to introducing straw breathing technique to Mum so she has a real tool to help her through these spasms. The first shows moving images of an actual larynx in action and in spasm, so if you're queasy, I guess maybe close your eyes for that. The second explains how breathing through the correct size of straw can relax the spasm. Both videos are found at laryngopedia dot com. Look under disorders, then airway, the laryngospasm Please note that this doctor is not addressing ALS in particular, he's just addressing the laryngospasm.

Laryngospasm, Part I: Introduction
Dr. Bastian explains laryngospasm with video of the larynx and a simulated attack. You will hear the types of noises often made by the person experiencing laryngospasm and see what the vocal folds are doing at the same time.

Laryngospasm, Part II: Straw Breathing
Laryngospasm is a sudden, often severe attack of difficulty breathing, typically lasting between 30 and 90 seconds. In this video, Dr. Bastian explains a simple procedure — straw breathing — that can be used by individuals suffering an attack.


There's also the "Larsen Manoevre" which has been mentioned on another thread here, and here are a couple of videos on that. It's a manoevre you can do to yourself, or your PAL.

Technique
Firmly push the soft tissue just behind the earlobes of the patient’s ears. Be sure not to go too inferiorly along the ramus of the mandible. You want to push at a point as superior as you can go in this notch. Push both sides firmly inward towards the skull base. Simultaneously, push anteriorly similar to a jaw-thrust maneuver. This should break the laryngospasm within 1-2 breaths.

It’s unclear about the mechanism behind why this works. Here are some theories:

You are just performing a jaw-thrust maneuver.
You are providing a deep painful stimuli, which causes the vocal cords to relax.
You are stimulating deep cranial nerves which happen to also stimulate the vagus nerve.


I'm hoping I don't have to do this Larsen Manoevre. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eIdWRYOQenQ Also see: https://www.aliem.com/2010/12/trick-of-trade-laryngospasm-notch/ Again, these videos are not specifically about ALS, just the spasms.

CALS and PALS also point out that if you did actually pass out, your larynx would relax and you'd be able to breathe again. Good to know.

Best,

Kathy
 
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Kristina1

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Someone shared these videos with me in the past when I complained about laryngospasms. Thank you for bringing them back to attention of any new members. Laryngospasms have been the most terrifying experiences for me. Please also consider what your mom's triggers might be. I discovered several food triggers. Cutting them out has helped reduce occurances immensely.
 

Katalin

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Lost a loved one
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Thanks Kristina, Mum's were in the middle of the night, away from food. I think she's been having poor breathing function, which we're getting checked out on Tuesday at the clinic. As the doctor mentioned, maybe it was just some fluff or dry air. It also happened once while she was crying hard, so there may be an emotional. It was pretty heartbreaking when she said this disease doesn't even allow her to cry. :( But you're right, you have to do some sleuthing to figure out triggers, and it's worth the work to do that. Interesting that the doctor also said there are medications to consider if the spasms happen more than once a week. He doesn't say what that medication is.
 
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