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Citlalli

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Joined
May 25, 2007
Messages
26
Reason
CALS
Country
Mexico
State
Morelos
City
Tepoztlan
Hi,

We are in the process of getting a lift as I can no longer carry my husband, I have been doing it far beyond where I should've stopped and have huge back and neck problems, I am in constant pain, so I really need a solution. I need something that will help both with transfers and with hoisting him up in his chair as he tends to slip.

Now after seeing the video on the pivot lift from the link in Mikes post for donating his, I am confused, it seems that it is a much better option than a sling one, is it? Can people tell me what is better? I don't think They sell the pivot lifts in Mexico But I am willing to move heaven and earth if it is really worth it. We recently bought a van, wheelchair and magitek sensor system in the US and imported it to Mexico, which was very hard but doable.

I really need something to help me out here.

What do you use?
Mike, why did you donate yours?


I would very much appreciate your experience in this matter.

Citlalli
 

nspoc

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Joined
Mar 24, 2007
Messages
113
Reason
CALS
Country
US
State
Illinois
City
Olympia Fields
Hi Citlalli -

We used the Easy Pivot for a few months - kind of clumsy to move, but comfortable for the patient. Big problems occurred as Pat (my friend with ALS) progressed. Her breathing made it impossible to hold the position required for more than a few seconds. Also, once she got her feeding tube the Easy Pivot caused pain and bleeding at the tube site. Even if you have no breathing problems - the lift is VERY clumsy, and nearly impossible to use on rugs - requires a lot of force to push. Best for pivoting from a chair to a commode. Not so useful in getting someone out of bed - requires too much floor space. Ours has been sitting in a corner unused for a year - we will be giving it away if anyone at our clinic can use it. Since its usefulness is so temprary - I would try to borrow one, rather than purchase it.

The Hoyer is OK - also clumsy, and nearly impossible for bathroom use. But if you do use it - the sling is pretty secure. But you have to watch the hooks - they can cut the patients thighs - protect with towels. Also the patient can swing quite a bit- which makes movement tricky, and can be unnerving to patient. It will be useful for a much longer time than the Easy Pivot, and costs less.

We use a Voyager Easytrack Portable Overhead Lift. - our best investment. I can move Pat from bed to commode and back in about 4 minutes. I never have to lift - the machine does it. Since it is an overhead track it does not require much floorspace. No force at all - just glide patient into position and lower onto chair, commode, bed, etc. There is even a configuration that allows patient to use bathtub and regular toilet. Pat is VERY happy to be able to take a regular bath - the water makes her feel less heavy, and is very relaxing.

The best aspect is that it is portable - we have taken it to hotels, and friends' homes. It is quick and easy to take apart - but it is heavy - about 50 lbs. Not suitable for taking apart and moving about your house - best for traveling.

This device has given Pat and me a great deal of freedom from worry - she cannot fall, and is quite comfortable. It even lowers to the ground in case patient has fallen from a chair or the bed - you can lift him right off the ground an put him into bed or in his chair.

Try voyager.com for more info - the website has a video.

The price was less than the Easy Pivot and it is MUCH easier to use.

Hope this helps - Beth
 

lunarruna

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Joined
May 20, 2006
Messages
145
Reason
CALS
Country
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State
xx
City
xxxx
Citlalli,
We use an electric (battery-powered) Hoyer-type lift and a sling...I cant compare with the others since I havent used those. But I find it pretty easy to move Shannon with the lift and sling. I remember back a year or so ago when I was transferring him by myself and how I ached all the time--back, elbows, etc! I feel for you--whatever you get it will be a big help....
As with anything it takes time to work out your 'system' There are many types of slings and we like the divided leg ones. Also head support is a problem--Shannon wears a neck brace when I move him.
Good Luck to you...Beth (another Beth!)
 

landscape

Active member
Joined
Jan 14, 2007
Messages
82
Reason
CALS
Diagnosis
07/2006
Country
CA
State
Western Provinces
City
Erehwon
My vote goes to the Voyager lift as well. We have ceiling track rather than the portable frame but the concept is exactly the same. So easy to get my husband into the bath! It's an excellent device.

We have three pieces of track (one in the bedroom, one in the bathroom and one in the living room). I can move the lift from one track to the other without difficulty.

I have used the Hoyer at work and the long projecting base on this type of lift makes it unsuitable for use to transfer into a bath tub at home--the projecting base is a nuisance anywhere actually. The Voyager is much, much easier to use!

Just thinking about the wheelchair, Citlalli. Does the chair tilt? If not can you get some help to modify either the back or the seat so that your husband is less inclined to slip? If you have access to an OT or a physio they should be able to help.
 

clewbcg

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Joined
Apr 9, 2008
Messages
42
Reason
CALS
Diagnosis
09/2006
Country
US
State
Utah
City
Heber City
Lift Questions

My pals has a feeding tube, electric wheelchair and a bipap. We now are looking at lifts since his legs are getting weaker and weaker. I've looked at websites and threads on here and am still confused. Can anyone answer the following questions?
1. Does insurance cover the purchase?
2. The hoyer looks wide at the base. Does it fit through bathroom doors?
3. Some complaints on websites refer to difficulty getting over carpet-any experience with this?
4. Do the slings have to come on and off on the commode, bed wheelchair etc. or do they stay on?
5. Do the overhead track models require overhead tracks installed in your house? I read a reference to traveling with one, and I don't get how that would work.
6. There seems to be a wide variety of slings. Any recommendations?

Any input would be appreciated. This site has been my life saver over and over again.
 

Al

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Joined
May 25, 2004
Messages
7,960
Reason
PALS
Diagnosis
10/2003
Country
CA
State
On
City
NW of Toronto
Don't know about ins. but MDA or ALSA may have loaners. I got mine on loan. Hoyer lift.
The legs on mine can be moved outwards for better balance and the chair is wider than the closed legs. My chair is 26 1/2 inches wide. My doors are 36 inches.
Moving on carpet is really hard. A friend put plastic carpet protectors like offices have under desks on her carpet. Not as good as wood floor but it worked.
I usually take my sling off just to avoid mishaps during loose bowel movements but it could be left on.
Overhead tracks are hung from your ceiling. Someone does make a portable device that you can put up over a bed to do transfers to a chair. Can't remember who makes it.
I think my sling is quite versatile. I'll get the name tomorrow if you don't mind.
Hope this helps..

AL.
 

Micheline

Active member
Joined
Sep 23, 2008
Messages
80
Reason
PALS
Diagnosis
11/2008
Country
CA
State
British Columbia
City
Campbell River
hello, I posted some pictures of our lift, with the help of our daughter...lol the lift it self to move from room to room is 15 lbs.
 

clewbcg

Active member
Joined
Apr 9, 2008
Messages
42
Reason
CALS
Diagnosis
09/2006
Country
US
State
Utah
City
Heber City
thanks for the ideas and pictures

Al, Thanks for the good idea about the plastic carpet runners. I never would have thought of that. That may make the hoyer lift more useable-we have alot of carpet. Micheline, thanks for the pictures. If you have tracks in different rooms, do you change the motor/lifter thingy from track to track, or are the tracks all connected? These questions sound stupid, but I'm having a hard time trying to work out what would be the best system. I'm thinking the main areas we need are wheelchair to toilet/bathtub, and wheelchair to bed. Our bathroom is small and tight inside so maybe a track would make more sense? Al, I would like the name of your sling if you don't mind. The selection is pretty confusing to me.
 

DgtofTNfan

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Learn about ALS
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Louisville
clewbcg

Medicare covers lifts under the Part B plan at 80% unless you have a supplement to pick up the 20%. Most insurance carriers follow Medicare guidelines. The criteria is..

  • You must need the help of at least two people to be transferred from the bed to a chair, wheelchair, or commode.
  • You would be confined to the bed without the use of a lift.
A physician order and certificate of medical necessity are required.

Medicare does not cover electrical lift devices. They are considered a convenience feature. However, you can apply the cost of the manual lift towards the purchase price of an electric model by using an Advance Beneficiary Notice (ABN). You will have to pay the difference between the two items.

However....

Here is a MDA website that compares lifts if you have not checked it out already.
http://www.mda.org/publications/quest/q132wheelturns.html

Of particular note is...

While most hydraulic lifts are covered by insurance or funded by Medicare or Medicaid with a prescription from your doctor, power mobile lifts are more tricky to get funded because the power component isn’t considered medically necessary, Bales says.

To get a power lift funded, you’d have to document that your caregiver has physical problems that don’t allow him or her to use a hydraulic or manual lift.

...You can also check with your local MDA office to see whether any lifts are available through the loan closet


We have not needed a lift yet so I can't help with difference in use.
 

SteveS

Active member
Joined
Sep 23, 2008
Messages
98
Reason
Loved one DX
Diagnosis
11/2008
Country
CA
State
BC
City
Campbell River
Micheline, thanks for the pictures. If you have tracks in different rooms, do you change the motor/lifter thingy from track to track, or are the tracks all connected?

These tracks are 8ft long and we have 4 of them ATM. One is in the bedroom (one Mich took the pics of) that runs up the center of her side of the bed. One is in the hallway above the chair lift, one is in living room above the easy-boy chair and the last is at the bottom of the stairs (to transfer from chair lift to power chair or manual chair). We are getting one more installed in the bathroom so she can go from toilet to shower. I had to take the small wall that the shower head is on down 13 inches so they can install the track. Luckily for us the ceiling is a drop ceiling and everything is placed beautifully around the beams that run in the right direction. The lift itself is portable and we just take it track to track as we need it. One person can run it like myself or our kids. the ALS Society provided the lift, we had to pay to have tracks done. 500.00+ for the tracks done to date but the bathroom one is going to be approx 700 since it requires a more custom install. The track itself has to be almost horseshoe shaped. We unfortunately only have one bathroom and it is small. Hope this answers your question(s).
 

clewbcg

Active member
Joined
Apr 9, 2008
Messages
42
Reason
CALS
Diagnosis
09/2006
Country
US
State
Utah
City
Heber City
Thank you

Thank you for all of the advice-particularly as to insurance issues. I think I'm seeing the light now as to which way to go.
 

Al

Moderator emeritus
Joined
May 25, 2004
Messages
7,960
Reason
PALS
Diagnosis
10/2003
Country
CA
State
On
City
NW of Toronto
Can't read the model number but my sling is a medium split leg commode sling with head support. Not sure of the make but it is distributed by Sunrise Medical.

AL.
 
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