Flying small aircraft

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Snowbird

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Another question. i have noticed several small aircraft as logos or whatever. could there be any connection between flying and als or related diseases? my husband misses flying his cessna 182 more than anything.
 

Al

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Hi snowbird. tHat's a new one on me but i did Have a private pilot licence too but never gave it any tHougHt. my dad tHinks it could Have my scuba diving. i tHink it was toxic exposure as a firefigHter as tHere is anotHer firefigHter on my job witH als as well. i know of a few otHer firefigHter's tHat Have it too. tHat job is stressful too. maybe anotHer cause. tHere is a pinpoint als survey on anotHer site tHat leans Heavily on questions about farming and pesticide use. once again more questions tHan answers. sorry i couldn't be more Help.
 

TBear

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Hi snowbird:
i know you're looking for answers and tHanks. i believe tHat cHris worked as ground crew for air canada and from His logo, i'd suspect Has Had some experience witH deicing cHemicals. i on tHe otHer Hand am a pilot... and i don't Have als. my wife did, and was a kindergarten teacHer.
cHris and i botH, However live in a House full of women (wHen tHey are Home from scHool)!
cHeers

t.
 

Snowbird

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Re aircraft & firefighters

Oddly enough, my husband was fire chief in our small rural community for about 20 yrs, and a fireman for about 43 yrs.

there is no harm in all of us trying to find some common denominators in these diseases so that we might be able to help others prevent the disease (if at all possible).

was there a link for the other survey?
 

Al

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Interesting that we find another firefighter. try this link.
http://members.aol.com/alspinpoint/index.html
they get you to post your answers i think the first monday of the month. go to the survey results to see this months results.
 

Timshelper

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Dear snowbird,
finding common links is definitly a starting point. tim restored and remodeled old cars. he worked in a closed confinement with lots of paint and sautering fumes from the metals on the old cars. i think when he had his hair analysis done he was full of mercury and i'm sure his occupation was a factor. if this isnt a common link i'm wondering if has to do with the effect it has on a person with als and how fast their symptoms progress versus lets say someone who was a teacher or a mother or etc. you get the iDea.
kim
als about loving someone
 

Snowbird

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Common links to victims of ALS & related diseases

Yikes! this is really getting scary!

my husband is an automotive dealer, and there was a paint shop in one of the dealerships. actually his dad did most of the body work and painting, and he died of a very acute and rare form of leukemia at age 67 (in 1 month after diagnosis.) my brother in law died of prostate cancer at age 54 after an 8 1/2 yr battle with it.

my husband also has a very rare 'mantle cell lymphoma', currently in remission.

so, flying, rural living, farming, autobody work, carbontet, etc. could possibly all have triggered this. who knows, but the stress of owning 3 businesses and losing his brother certainly added to his stress level.

i have asked him and his doctors numerous times to get his heavy metal levels tested, and they all think i am nuts. has anyone else gone through the testing? i.e. hair analysis, chelation, or whatever ?
 

Timshelper

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Dear snowbird,
yikes is right i forgot to mention that tim did have chelation treatments he felt better for awhile but that was in his first stages and the cost is very expensive he finally had to quit.he also went to a small town up north where they have this chamber that a lot of cancer patients use to cleanse the body i cant remember the name of it right now but he spent 5 days there while they tried to remove the toxins from his body. they also used these chinese pads that he wore stuck to his feet and when he woke up in the morning they were pitch black. that showed him how many toxins he actually had running through his body. after using these pads continuously the pads should of got lighter in color but they never did. he did get his brother to use them just to see if this was some gimmick. his brothers showed a few toxins but they were not black.again the pads were very costly. the only thing he didnt try was colonics he felt it to be an evasive procedure and by this time after all the other probing he had done he just gave up.he got all his fillings redone because the old silver ones are supposedly filled with mercury. looking for the cure can break you finacially especially if you dont have the money to begin with. i wished he would of went for accupuncture but its too late now.
kim tims helper
als about loving someone
 

Snowbird

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One can't help but wOnder if removing the toxins would help, but as you say, it is prohibitively expensive.

in general, holistic doctors try to treat the 'cause' of a disease. cOnventiOnal doctors sometimes prefer to treat the 'symptoms'.

do you think acupuncture would have helped? i had questiOned that as well, and our doctors Only thought it would help with pain cOntrol.
 

me

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Snowbird - to answer your last question, i think carol d. and her henry have used acupuncture and felt it at least helped a bit. i'm sure she'll be here soon and be able to answer specifically.

my husband has done some flying many years ago, but probably not enough to affect him this way. he is definitely having some sort of neurological problems but is not currently diagnosed with anything. he has been a welder for many years which is shown is some studies to cause certain problems such as parkinsons syndrome. i would have to think that there is some sort of link with toxins. he grew up in the outskirts of the city but not really rural by definition. he has also had some very stressful events occur in the last few years. maybe the toxins create an environment within the body that makes you more prone to als and the stress triggers it....or the other way around! who knows. maybe all of our information here will help someone figure this all out.

he was tested for certain toxins such as manganese, mercury, admium, lead and arsenic. all were in the normal ranges, actually, some appear to be on the very low end....? -me-
 

me

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Okay, i just clicked on al's link above, and in reading through it i realized...he worked at an airport for 7 or 8 years. it was a small, non-commercial airport where he was involved in everything from loading luggage to de-icing, fueling....and, perhaps, the use of chemicals to debug the aircraft? i'll have to ask him. very interesting....-me-
 

Snowbird

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TOXIC FUMES ..............

Al, I am sorry I could not open your link. My computer has become very fussy these days and won't let me open many sites.

Anyway, since last posting I have learned a few things. Although we may not be able to do extraordinary things to cure people currently with ALS/MND, we might be able to find more common links with ALS/MND victims, and at least 'try' to help protect and warn our future generations.

An ALS/MND health worker recently told us that 85-95% of PALS are from rural settings, in particular farmers. Second are people in the 'automotive industries', and third are 'firefighters'.

It also appears that welders & painters can also be at high risk.

Now having said this, I am wondering if these diseases are acquired largely through 'inhaled' toxins. What do you all think?

e.g. small aircraft pilots fuel their own planes, commercial aircraft workers often do de-icing and re-fueling, and ultimately inhaling toxins.

Farmers work constantly with chemical fertilizers, herbicides, and pesticides. ('Cide' meaning 'death'.) Farmers not only handle chemicals, but they 'flag' for spray planes. Once again exposing themsleves to 'inhaled' toxins.

My vet claims that he has lost 5 comrades in the rural veterinary field recently to ALS/MND, all within the 50-60 age group. Not sure what would cause that. However, I do know of a foal that died after the ditches were sprayed for something and the chemicals drifted towards the horses.

Automotive personnel are always exposed to chemicals in the shop as well as fumes, paints, filings, welding, etc.

Firefighters breathe in every imaginable chemical toxin ever placed on this earth. (They do not always wear masks nor air tanks.)

Although all will claim that they take every precaution with masks, safety clothing, etc. I know from first-hand hospital work and farming that this simply is not true.

I cannot save my husband from the advances of these diseases, but I would appreciate any help from the rest of you that might help us to 'prevent' this disease in the future. And sad to say, my husband was involved in all of the above. I will give you our story in the very near future.

And a few years back there were documentaries about housewives or housekeepers ending up in wheelchairs & worse due to the fumes of mixing chemical cleaners together. Do any of you remember that?

Do you remember 'nerve gas' and 'mustard gas' ? Were the results similar to ALS/MND ?

One last observation pointed out to us is that most of the major commercial chemical companies are also involved in 'drug' production. Hmmmmmmm..........

Thanks to you all!
 

Snowbird

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I forgot to add that many of the Gulf War pilots apparently ended up with ALS/MND's. Are there any out there that would be willing to share their stories?

As for housewives and schoolteachers, what about the gallons of hairspray that we used to use, and spray-on deodorants? Bug sprays, window cleaning sprays, cleaning sprays, etc. SPRAY, SPRAY, SPRAY !
 

Jessie

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common denominators in als

Good Morning
Interesting commonalities with Pals and flying, chemical toxins, rural living.
Vic and I have noticed what we think is another common factor: extreme athletic activity. Vic was a long distance runner, regularly running 10 miles and entered marathons and half marathons. The last marathon he ran, he had intense cramping of his leg muscles almost causing him to fall. Shortly after that, his toe drop started.
We know of other marathoners, body builders, golfers who golf 18 holes without a cart several times a week and now have ALS.
Vic has jokingly said his Type A personality might be a factor. Who knows?!?!?
Thanks to all who responded to my question on cramp discomfort at night.
Vic's Dr has prescribed Oxycodone and that has helped somewhat although Vic was reluctant to take a narcotic.
A peaceful and upbeat Sunday to all of you.
Jessie
 

Snowbird

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Hi Jessie! It does seem that several athletes have had ALS/MND. Also several musicians. With athletes, could it be lactic acid build-up? With musicians, perhaps smoke in nightclubs if that is where they played, or whatever ? Golfers, who knows ? Some bodybuilders use steroids, so could that perhaps be a contributing factor?

My husband found that 800 mg Vit E helped with pain or cramps. Has your husband tried them?

Type 'A' personality, well that also seems to fit. I am curious what others have to say.

My husband also had Mantle Cell Lymphoma, and the doctors still do not know if the 2 rare diseases are related.
 
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