CHILL OUT

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rcharlton

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Here's a summary from an interesting article. Explains a bit why excessive exercise may be damaging for PALS.

1: Med Hypotheses. 2005 Dec 1; [Epub ahead of print] Related Articles, Links

Cooler biologically compatible core body temperatures may prolong longevity and combat neurodegenerative disorders.

Salerian AJ, Saleri NG.

Washington Center for Psychiatry, 5225 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 104, Washington, DC 20015, United States.

Scientific evidence suggests the critical role of temperature in regulating three mechanisms contributing to cellular damage: Oxidative stress, oxygen demand overload and inflammation. In this article, we propose that the Arrhenius rate law has a profound impact on aging and a variety of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease, and we review the supporting evidence. Published studies suggest empirical correlations between temperature and lifespan of various organisms, bolstering the hypothesis that variations in lifespan may stem from differences in the mitochondrial production rates of radicals - a process also influenced by temperature. Given the exponential temperature dependency of all biochemical factors, cooler body temperatures may promote longevity and combat neurodegenerative disorders. This promises to offer extraordinary yet unexplored weapons against two formidable enemies of the human body: aging and neurodegenerative disorders. Stated in the form of a thesis referred to as Salerian and Saleri Temperature Thesis (SSTT): "Cooler biologically compatible core body temperatures prolong lifespan and are of value to combat illness". Double blind studies of SSTT in therapeutic strategies against amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or early-stage Alzheimer's disease may offer a reasonable first stage to validate SSTT. In view of the known rapid progressive neurodegeneration associated with ALS, minute variations in core body temperature may, in fact, demonstrate statistically significant differences in disease progression.
 

Meg1

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rcharlton said:
Here's a summary from an interesting article. Explains a bit why excessive exercise may be damaging for PALS.
...except that every study I've ever seen that addresses the issue of ALS and exercise has concluded that exercise slows, rather than speeds, progression. But I suppose we could quibble over the meaning of the word "excessive."
 

rcharlton

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It always seemed counter-intuitive to me that anyone would claim that excercise is a bad thing.

I continue to exercise regularly - occasionally excessively - but I've often seen references to the danger of exercise for PALS due to the increased production of free radicals - a concept I am still trying to understand.

Meg - can you provide info on these articles?

A friend of mine who is in Med School at UofT believes that she has early onset ALS and had devoted a lot of time to this issue - she also refuses to exercise due to the risk of "free radicals" - so I would like to pass along the articles to her...
 

upila

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Hi Richard,
As we too were asking the same question, I actually called the Univ. of Saskatchewan at end of Dec. 2005, where a clinical trial had just been concluded on "Study of the Effects Strengthening Exercise in the Early Stages of ALS."
Spoke with the individual conducting the study, as she was preparing her report to be published in January of 2006.
In short:
Low impact, moderate exrecise is beneficial, to the effect that it prolongs flexibility and range of motion...

I have no idea where these trial results are published, but someone always posts them, when available. Let's hope, she has more to say, which was not disclosed when I spoke with her...

So, nothing new there - and yes, I would not go and over tax your muscles. It may hasten/will weaken them, each time you go beyond what feels normal and if you feel pain or strain while, during or after exercising. But light work-out will be beneficial.
 

Meg1

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Re:

upila said:
So, nothing new there - and yes, I would not go and over tax your muscles. It may hasten/will weaken them, each time you go beyond what feels normal and if you feel pain or strain while, during or after exercising. But light work-out will be beneficial.
There is no clinical research to support the above statement that "over tax"ing muscles will hasten weakness (of course it may be true--it's just that the research hasn't been done on heavy exercise). My doctors encourage me to exercise as much as possible--even quizzing me on the extent of workouts.
 

upila

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There is an ongoing clinical trial to assess the heavy workout in LAS patients. Exercise is supposed to spur-on the body's natural growth hormones, hence try to help the muscles, hence nerve endings to reach muscles. From what my father has experienced, and he used to work-out in a gym, weights and all, over-doing it does not affect him well at all. The resulting over-firing of the neurons, brings on weakness few days later, after an initial feel-good period.
One thing is for certain - there is NOTHING consistant or certain with ALS.
 

rcharlton

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Hi Upila,

That's been my approach as well - until I get some clearer information on this subject I am taking a middle of the road approach - low impact cardiovascular exercise just to give the joints a work out.

Meg is right - I don't think there have been any studies showing that exercise may be harmful - and there is no disputing the benefits of regular exercise in "normal" situations - but I still have some concerns and until I get a few more answers, I will try and minimize exposing my body to the stress of excessive "no pain no gain" exercise.

I'm still exercising more than most "normal" people do anyway...
 
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