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soonerwife

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My PALS had his clinic appointment yesterday. His PFT's have declined more.

His neurologist wants him to sleep with some incline so he will have less chance of aspirating.

I need suggestions on what works best. Bed wedges, adjustable beds, pillows?

What are the pros and cons to adjustable beds compared to hospital beds?

We are not at the hospital bed point and my PALS would not like that option. I just want to consider whether or not to consider the expense of an adjustable bed.
 

scaredwifetx

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I do know that several CALS and PALS are using adjustable beds. Steve had to go into a hospital bed because of his PFT's. He is able to raise his head and his feet and he now sleeps better
 

WendyWooG

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For me the advantage of the hospital bed is that I have been able to tilt the whole bed, not just use the profiling to raise legs or sit up. So once I am in a comfy position with the normal profiling bit, necessary as I can't lay flat any more, I can then tilt he whole thing to either alleviate swelling in my ankles or in the opposite direction to help if I am congested.

I have a rotten cold and pleurisy at the moment the ability to tilt has been invaluable.

Wendy x
 

Nuts

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We moved my guy from the adjustable bed to the hospital bed. Being able to raise and lower the bed save my back. The hospital bed also offers places to hang equipment, which our adjustable bed didn't.
 

KW1234

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I am in the same situation and currently use a bunch of pillows but it isn't comfortable and I slide down. We are currently looking at adjustable beds. I am hopeful that will work for some time. We are also installing a ceiling track in our new house which I hope will make maneuvering easier for care givers. One of my concerns though is falling out of bed as I lose more strength.
 

affected

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There is an emotional adjustment needed to move into a hospital bed. For most people, they can view an adjustable 'real' bed as some kind of luxury item. Not so a hospital bed, no matter how amazing they are at meeting a PALS needs.

In practicality they are the best option for all the reason already stated.

It's always so hard to say whether the expense of an adjustable bed will be worthwhile as we can never predict the rate of progression. I so wish we could give the answer you want xx
 

swalker

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My doctor recommended a hospital bed for me over a year ago.

I listened carefully and then decided to make do with my regular bed. I use pillows, and they really help. I am considering getting a wedge to see how that works out.

When the time comes, I believe I will move directly from the regular bed to a hospital bed.

Why is it so hard to give up my regular bed and go with a hospital bed? It is simply not rational. After all, they are both beds. Yet, it is very hard.

Steve
 

Cammarak

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Got two xtra long twin (to make a king) adjustable beds. Been a god send for me. If your room is large enough get just a twin adjustable bed for your pal and put it next to yours. The ability to elevate your upper and lower body as needed is incredible to assuring your comfort while you sleep.
 

scaredwifetx

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Soonerwife, like Tillie said it's a very tough decision. I remember all to well...the day the bed arrived. We made it up and I did my very best to make it look like anything other than a hospital bed. My daughter surprised Steve with a new and very comfy new adjustable mattress. He climbed in the bed that night and I came a little undone. I cried, he cried and we ended up going to the other room to sleep.

The next day... I went and bought a twin bed for me and put it next to his bed. It was still hard...but it was the best decision we have made. He can adjust it and sleeps very well and I can also get my rest. The need for rest is o very important to both of us.
 

Cammarak

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This really is the best way--my tossing and turning and leg spawning kept my husband awake--now he is unaffected by my sleep(or lack thereof) and I can adjust the bed any number of ways to get comfortable.
 

lgelb

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Sooner, I don't see buying an adjustable bed given where his lung function is. A hospital bed doesn't have to look like one. You don't need a headboard or footboard, or even side rails if you don't want them. You put linens on it and it just looks like a bed. The motor is under the bed. Who is looking?

But the ability to tilt forward in addition to raising head and/or legs cannot be overstated as an advantage with impaired breathing. And when it comes to Hoyer transfers or an overbed table, every inch of flexibility can really help.
 

Aussiemndcarer

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We have the hospital bed still parked quietly in the corner of our lounge room. My Pals just can't get used to being transferred into it! Hates the idea. We gave up on our queen bed as I was turning him 4-5 times every night. It really upset me, but my Pals didn't seem to mind. Now he sleeps in a recliner with feet elevated & I sleep on the lounge next to him. Whatever it takes! All I know is that his comfort is priority #1.
 

Dave K

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Each PALS has individual needs. I know a 15-year PALS who has always liked her sleep number bed. My wife tried several kinds of bed setups before realizing she needed a fully electric hospital bed to help her stand to get out of bed independently. We moved our king size bed out and replaced it with her hospital bed and and extra long twin for me so I can lay next to her. We kept the king headboard so we can make the two beds up with a single king comforter when they are aren't being used. Looks pretty nice.

When she eventually needed her lateral rotation mattress, the hospital bed became essential because of how those mattresses are designed.
 

Diane H

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I am in a real Mother Hen mood today so... I hate to hear of anyone resorting to sleeping in a recliner. Does he have a ROHO or similar pressure relief cushion under him and a pressure relief pad for his back? If he is going to sleep sitting up even part way, his bottom is going to get more pressure than a factory seat cushion can compensate for. Pressure sores hurt. Adding a pressure relief cushion under him requires padding the armrests to keep the weight of his arms from gradually causing subluxation or even dislocation of the shoulders. That hurts. Are his legs supported by extra pillows in the gap between the chair seat and the footrest? Without that extra support, the weight of his lower legs is all on his calves and that reduces circulation. Swelling still occurs even though his feet are up. A footrest also needs a cushioned block at the end to prevent footdrop which also hurts. And pads to elevate the back of his feet to keep pressure off his heels. And -- out of Mother Hen and into Marriage counselor -- the hospital bed and a twin bed for you would allow the beds to be at the same level so you could at least touch him. They do make foam wedges to bridge that gap between separate mattresses. Makes a few minutes of bedtime snuggle without crowding possible!
 

soonerwife

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Has anyone used the bed wedges or any other method before getting the adjustable or hospital bed? What did you think of them?
 
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