Thread: Food options
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Old 06-13-2016, 06:18 AM #5 (permalink)
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Default Re: Food options

Good point Nikki and the reporting of food getting stuck to the roof of the mouth struck me - this is a sure sign the tongue is atrophying as the tongue is used constantly when chewing to move the food around the mouth to create the bolus.

This is a second part of what makes swallowing so difficult and dangerous. Often the focus is on the throat and how the swallow reflex is working. But the loss of control of food inside the mouth means that a good food bolus is not formed and as a result often swallowing starts a little early as food just migrates without permission to the back of the tongue. The food being swallowed is also not a nice round ball of chewed up food, but bits of half chewed food.

This is where modifying the texture of foods and using smoothies with heaps of calories can really help you keep eating by mouth safely a lot longer.

If you are going to have a peg, I recommend you get things started now. Have it done while you are still fairly strong, have some weight on you, and before your breathing declines a lot. You can still eat by mouth. A good strategy is to just eat half a meal, since it takes so long, and have the other half pureed and put down the peg. You get to enjoy eating, but get a full meal of calories in without totally wearing yourself out.
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